Sweden flowers: Wild Angelica

Angelica sylvestris, Angelica montana, SE: Strätta,
DE: Wald-Engelwurz, NL: Gewone engelwortel,
UK: Wild Angelica, wood angelica, Oat-shooters, Trumpet Keck

Scientific name:  Angelica sylvestris L.
Synonym name:  Angelica montana Brot.
Swedish name:  Strätta
German name:  Wald-Engelwurz
Nederlandse naam:  Gewone engelwortel
English name:  Wild Angelica, wood angelica, Oat-shooters, Trumpet Keck
Family:  Apiaceae / Umbelliferae, Carrot Family, Flockblommiga växter

Sweden Wildflowers, Travel, Nature

Life form:  Perennial herb
Stems:  Height 150–200 cm, smooth, reddish
Leaves:  Alternate, compound, bipinnate, dentate
Flowers:  Large compound umbels of white or purple flowers
Flowering Period:  July, August
Fruits:  2-parted schizocarp, 4–5 mm long
Habitat:  Forest, thicket, coast, fresh water, bogs, marshes, pastureland, meadows

Angelica sylvestris,Angelica montana, Strätta, Wald-Engelwurz, Gewone engelwortel, Wild Angelica


Derivation of the botanical name:
Angelica from angelicus (Latin), "angelic", ultimately related to Greek αγγελος (angelos) "messenger".
sylvestis, sylvestr, "belonging to the forest or woods", more correctly: silvestris.
Oat-shooters, Children shoot oats through the hollow stems as peas are shot through a pea-shooter.
Trumpet Keck; Parkinson says: " In Sussex they call the wilde kinde (of Angelica) Kex, and the weavers winde their yarne on the dead stalks". It is called Trumpet Keck because the hollow stems of this plant are made by boys into trumpets. " Trumpet-kecks are passed unheeded by Whose hollow stalks inspired such eager joy."
  • The standard author abbreviation L. is used to indicate Carl Linnaeus (1707 – 1778), a Swedish botanist, physician, and zoologist, the father of modern taxonomy.
  • The standard author abbreviation Brot. is used to indicate Felix de Silva Avellar Brotero (1744 – 1828), a Portuguese botanist, lector of Botany and Agriculture at the University of Coimbra, with a PhD in Medicine by the University of Reims
The first name is for oat-shooters. Children shoot oats through the hollow stems as peas are shot through a pea-shooter.
Parkinson (1567–1650) says: "In Sussex they call the wilde kinde (of Angelica) Kex, and the weavers winde their yarne on the dead stalks".
It is called Trumpet Keck because the hollow stems of this plant are made by boys into trumpets.
" Trumpet-kecks are passed unheeded by Whose hollow stalks inspired such eager joy."

In 1629, John Parkinson in his work, Paradisi in Sole Paradisus Terrestris, considered Angelica Root to be one of the most important herbs of the time. Angelica was even eaten as a vegetable and added to soups.
Legend has it that when the bubonic fever was ravaging Europe in 1665, a monk dreamt that an angel showed him a plant, angelica, a cure for the Great Plague of London, 1665–1666. Elizabethan Physicians doused themselves with vinegar and chew angelica before approaching a victim.
Angelica is used in the preparation of Vermouth and Chartreuse. Benedictine and Chartreuse monks still use Angelica root in their liqueurs.

Sweden, Nature, Wildflowers, Travel